Test Paper

Our Coaching Institute

Test Paper

Q 74- . A strong and effective grievance redressal system (GRS) is essential parts of public administration, in this context discuss how to better integrate public grievance redressal and delivery systems? (250 words)

  • Paper & Topic: GS II à E-Governance related issues

 

  • Model Answer:

 

  • Introduction:

 

  • The Grievance Redressal System, or GRS, is a process that allows stakeholders of corporate or governmental institutions to receive and remedy complaints or grievances, allowing for rapid action on any issues raised by them and hence better services.
  • A Grievance Redress Mechanism is an integral aspect of every administration's machinery.
  • Without an efficient and effective grievance redress procedure, no administration can claim to be accountable, responsive, or user-friendly.
  • In reality, an organization's grievance redress procedure serves as a barometer for its efficiency and effectiveness, as it gives critical input on the administration's operations.

 

  • Body:

 

  • GRS's Importance:

 

  • A government's grievance redressal mechanism is a crucial cog in the wheel.
  • The government and its administration will never be accountable or effective unless they have effective grievance redressal processes.
  • In a democracy, citizens elect the government and hold it accountable; for example, a lack of food, overloaded public transportation, late trains, and so on are examples of public grievances against the government.

 

  • GRS government actions include:

 

  • CPGRAMS (Central Public Grievance Redress and Monitoring System): This is an integrated online grievance redress and monitoring system created by the National Informatics Centre (NIC) in partnership with DARPG and DPG.
  • Citizens can use CPGRAMS to file complaints and track the progress of their cases. In 2007, this system was created.

 

  • PRAGATI (Proactive Governance and Timely Implementation): PRAGATI is a multi-modal and multi-purpose grievance redressal system established by the Prime Minister's Office (PMO) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIC).
  • It improves the Union Government's and State Government's cooperation and coordination in handling grievances and monitoring government initiatives.

 

  • E-Nivaran:
  • It was created by the Central Board of Direct Taxes for the online resolution of taxpayer disputes. This system allows taxpayers to register and track their complaints.

 

  • Unified Mobile Application for New-Age Governance (UMANG):
  • This is a single platform via which citizens across India can access e-governance services, ranging from the central government to local governments.
  •  
  • MyGov:
  • This platform, which was introduced in 2014, allows the government to broadcast information and solicit public feedback.

 

  • Nivaran:
  • In 2016, the Indian Railways launched an online facility to address the problems of lakhs of railway employees.

 

  • INGRAM (Integrated Grievance Redressal Mechanism):
  • This is a platform created by the Ministry of Consumer Affairs to answer public complaints about goods and services.

 

  • Mera Aspataal (My Hospital):
  • The Ministry of Health launched this app and online in 2017 as part of the National Health Mission.
  • Its purpose was to collect patient feedback on the services provided by government hospitals.
  • This will assist the government in improving the quality of health-care services supplied in public facilities.

 

  • Citizens Charter
  • Right to Information Act
  • Grama Sabha

 

  • Measures to improve the integration of public grievance redress and delivery systems include the following:

 

  • Regular analysis of public grievances received is a vital tool for efficient public grievance redressal, as it aids in the identification of problem areas.
  • While public grievances reflect the problem areas and challenges that confront institutions involved in service delivery and administration, they also offer the opportunity to address these problems before they explode in the form of public discontent through a Grievance Analysis Study conducted by the Quality Council of India to identify grievance prone areas, undertake root cause analysis, and recommend systematic analysis and reform.
  • Recognizing issues is the first step toward effectively resolving them.
  • If the goal is to win public trust or enhance the state of government, expression rather than repression of voice should be encouraged.
  • Public institutions can remedy poor performance by capturing and analysing public complaints in a timely and relevant manner.
  • It is critical to recognise that a participatory approach is required, in which public proposals for improving the functioning of institutions or policies are solicited and reviewed with an open mind.
  • Complaints and grievances must be addressed as part of the service delivery and quality standards.
  • With the high-profile cases of some private hospitals in Delhi and Gurgaon, as well as public health care hospitals across the country, it is clear that a clear and practical grievances and complaint redressal mechanism that is patient and public friendly and improves access, availability, and quality is urgently needed.

 

  • Conclusion:

 

  • In public administration, a strong and effective grievance redressal system (GRS) is critical.
  • It is known as the "heart of governance." People's trust in government is dependent on its ability to rapidly resolve public complaints.
  • Furthermore, a robust and effective GRS is a tool for assessing the efficiency of the organization's service delivery function.
Subscribe Daily newsletter